About Rebecca Allen

Rebecca Allen is Director of Education Datalab and an expert in the analysis of large scale administrative and survey datasets, including the National Pupil Database and School Workforce Census. Her research explores the impact of government reforms on school behaviour, with a particular focus on accountability and teacher labour markets. She is currently on leave from her academic post as Reader in Economics of Education at UCL Institute of Education.

Kent 11-plus, part 2: Some children will be being passed or failed incorrectly – but we have no idea how many

This is part of a series of posts from Datalab on how the 11-plus works in practice in Kent. Find the other posts in the series here. All tests are unreliable to some extent, so a person’s score is partly a matter of chance. This means that for some, the decision to offer a grammar [...]

By | 2017-05-05T06:51:07+00:00 May 5th, 2017|Admissions|

Kent 11-plus, part 1: The rules you set determine who passes

This post was updated at 20.00 on 5 May 2017 to clarify our view of how favourable a move to one of the three alternative sets of qualifying rules described in this post would be. This is part of a series of posts from Datalab on how the 11-plus works in practice in Kent. Find the [...]

By | 2017-05-05T20:08:23+00:00 May 5th, 2017|Admissions|

Kent 11-plus, part ii: How does the 11-plus work in Kent?

This is part of a series of posts from Datalab on how the 11-plus works in practice in Kent. Find the other posts in the series here. So, pupils sit a test and those with the highest scores get to go to grammar school. Right? Wrong. The process of securing a place at a Kent [...]

By | 2017-05-04T21:18:25+00:00 May 5th, 2017|Admissions|

Kent 11-plus, part i: An introduction to our work

This is part of a series of posts from Datalab on how the 11-plus works in practice in Kent. Find the other posts in the series here. Welcome to the first in a series of blogposts from Education Datalab on the experience of those who sit the 11-plus in Kent – determining who does, and [...]

By | 2017-05-04T21:18:06+00:00 May 5th, 2017|Admissions|

The 11-plus is a loaded dice – research report

The way the 11-plus works in Kent is akin to rolling a loaded dice, we conclude in a new research report [PDF]. We reach this conclusion because of the arbitrariness of who passes the test – coupled with the fact that several parts of the process act together to make disadvantaged children less likely to get in. Among [...]

By | 2017-05-04T21:11:38+00:00 May 5th, 2017|Reports|

‘Ordinary working families’ won’t get access to grammar schools – and government data confirms as much

The new government consultation on ‘ordinary working families’ is being used as the latest piece of arsenal to shore up support for grammar schools among the general public (the majority of whose children will, of course, get to attend secondary moderns). From it they conclude that the children of ordinary working families stand a good [...]

By | 2017-04-12T23:32:44+00:00 April 12th, 2017|Admissions, Pupil demographics|

‘Ordinary working families’ are not educationally disadvantaged – those claiming benefits are

The Department for Education has published a consultation document on family incomes, pupil attainment and school attended that will either fascinate (if you are a data cruncher) or terrify you (if you are a privacy campaigner). For the first time, the records of pupils sitting in the National Pupil Database have been matched to parental [...]

By | 2017-04-20T14:23:52+00:00 April 12th, 2017|Admissions, Exams and assessment, Pupil demographics|

Exploring subject background differences in senior leadership pay

In last week’s blogpost we noted that the pay of senior leaders in secondary schools appears to vary systematically according to their subject background. Here we report senior leadership pay in 2010 separately for headteachers, deputies and assistant heads, based on analysis of the School Workforce Census, and look at how it is associated with [...]

By | 2017-04-21T22:10:03+00:00 January 18th, 2017|School improvement, Teacher careers|