We investigate how parents’ preferences, school selectiveness and admissions policy determine who gets to go to which schools

Kent 11-plus, part i: An introduction to our work

This is part of a series of posts from Datalab on how the 11-plus works in practice in Kent. Find the other posts in the series here. Welcome to the first in a series of blogposts from Education Datalab on the experience of those who sit the 11-plus in Kent – determining who does, and [...]

By | 2017-05-04T21:18:06+00:00 May 5th, 2017|Admissions|

What PISA tells us about pupils from ordinary working families

Last week, we heard a lot from the government about their interest in children from ‘ordinary working families’. (For our initial take on the topic, see here and here.) In its new consultation document, the Department for Education has provided information on the GCSE grades and progress of these children – defined as those not [...]

By | 2017-04-20T15:34:42+00:00 April 20th, 2017|Admissions, Exams and assessment, Pupil demographics|

‘Ordinary working families’ won’t get access to grammar schools – and government data confirms as much

The new government consultation on ‘ordinary working families’ is being used as the latest piece of arsenal to shore up support for grammar schools among the general public (the majority of whose children will, of course, get to attend secondary moderns). From it they conclude that the children of ordinary working families stand a good [...]

By | 2017-04-12T23:32:44+00:00 April 12th, 2017|Admissions, Pupil demographics|

‘Ordinary working families’ are not educationally disadvantaged – those claiming benefits are

The Department for Education has published a consultation document on family incomes, pupil attainment and school attended that will either fascinate (if you are a data cruncher) or terrify you (if you are a privacy campaigner). For the first time, the records of pupils sitting in the National Pupil Database have been matched to parental [...]

By | 2017-04-20T14:23:52+00:00 April 12th, 2017|Admissions, Exams and assessment, Pupil demographics|

Social and ethnic inequalities in choice available and choices made at age 16

This morning the Social Mobility Commission published our research examining the choice of courses and institution made by students at age 16. We could see there were differences in the choices made by social background, ethnicity and gender of the student and wanted to measure the extent to which these arose through differences in: GCSE [...]

By | 2017-04-21T22:27:17+00:00 December 5th, 2016|Admissions, Post-16 provision, Pupil demographics, Reports|

Understanding grammar schools

Since the government’s announcement that it wants to see the return of more widespread selectivity to England’s education system we have written quite extensively about grammar schools and the impact of selectivity. In this post, however, we’re going to step back a little and offer a more descriptive overview of the existing network of selective [...]

By | 2016-12-07T12:55:00+00:00 December 1st, 2016|Admissions, Pupil demographics|

Apples to apples: are grammar schools really as effective as they seem?

This post was updated at 8.30 AM on 22 November. An earlier draft of the piece had originally been posted in error. What is the reasoning behind the government’s proposal for more selective schools: greater choice or better schools? Numerous studies have demonstrated that both have flawed foundations, including from the Education Policy Institute [PDF] and ourselves [PDF], [...]

Ethnic minority groups are great at passing the 11-plus

There are striking differences in the propensity of different ethnic groups to gain access to grammar schools. If we look at high achieving eleven-year-olds in the four fully selective local authorities of Kent, Medway, Buckinghamshire and Lincolnshire, just 29 per cent of the white British pupils who achieved a fine grade score of 5.0 on [...]

By | 2016-12-07T12:55:03+00:00 November 7th, 2016|Admissions, Pupil demographics|

When is a comprehensive school actually a secondary modern?

The National Association of Secondary Moderns might soon be growing its membership. By how much? It is hard to say, not least because not all non-grammar schools in selective areas choose to call themselves secondary moderns (just 117 do). Also, there are schools outside selective areas that are heavily affected by the presence of a [...]

By | 2016-12-07T12:55:03+00:00 November 2nd, 2016|Admissions, Pupil demographics|